Author Archives: noayaari

Into My Arms: A Blogpost in Progress

Noa Yaari, Into My Arms I, 2019. Ink on Paper, 17.7×25.4 cm. Toronto. Noa Yaari, Into My Arms II, 2019. Ink on Paper, 17.7×25.4 cm. Toronto.    

Posted in My Art

Multiform Grammar

Noa Yaari, Multiform Grammar is Making Us Rich, 2019. Mixed media, 17.7×25.4 cm. Toronto.

Posted in My Art

Multiform Grammar and the Working Memory

In 1974, psychologists Alan Baddeley and Graham Hitch offered a model of the working memory, which was revised by Baddeley in 2000. According to the 1974 model, the working memory is a system that enables temporary storage and manipulation of … Continue reading

Posted in Contemplations, My Art

Mother

Noa Yari, Mother, 2019. A poster. Toronto

Posted in Uncategorized

Queen

Noa Yaari, Queen, 2019. A poster. Toronto

Posted in Uncategorized

Pulling and Pushing Forces in Multiform References

Explicit, implicit and indeterminate multiform references (MFRs) maintain pulling and pushing forces between their verbal and visual poles. These forces are the mechanisms that potentially move readers to shift their attention between words and images across a multiform argument (MFA) … Continue reading

Posted in Contemplations, Dissertation, Teaching

Indeterminate Multiform References

Indeterminate multiform References (MFRs) begon with terms whose semantic relatedness with terms in the caption or the image is vague and challenging to classify; it is neither a clear semantic similarity, meronym-holonym or any other relatedness; however, indeterminate MFRs seem … Continue reading

Posted in Dissertation, Teaching

Implicit Multiform References

Implicit multiform references (MFRs) generate shifts of attention through semantic relatedness between the MFA’s verbal and visual components and their visual features without announcing their operation. For example, the presence of both the word “cat” and an image of a … Continue reading

Posted in Contemplations, Dissertation, My Art

Explicit Multiform References

Multiform references (MFRs) are classified into three main types: explicit, implicit and indeterminate. Within a multiform argument (MFA), an explicit MFR announces its own juxtaposition of the verbal and visual components, usually through brackets in the main text, and at … Continue reading

Posted in Dissertation

Multiform References

The integration of the verbal and visual components of multiform arguments (MFAs) into a cohesive utterance is possible by juxtaposing and entangling the semantic and visual aspects of words and images. This is feasible since printed words and printed images … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized