Author Archives: noayaari

Welcome to MFG: Welcome to the CRRS Library!

I’m currently working on an art project in the library of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies at the University of Toronto. The project is an installation entitled “Image-Text Relationships at the CRRS Library,” and it’s taking place in … Continue reading

Posted in My Art, Research

Using Multiform Grammar in Presentations

How do speakers who use both words and images employ MFG? And how can they do so intentionally and effectively? As you can see in the illustration below, the speaker refers to the image on the screen in three different … Continue reading

Posted in Contemplations, Research, Teaching

Zooming in on Multiform References

Posted in Research, Teaching

Visual Rhetoric : )

What happens to a punctuation mark that transforms into a representation of a pair of eyes or a smiling mouth? Is it still a punctuation mark, or is it a sign of a different kind? Let’s examine a colon that … Continue reading

Posted in Research

Into My Arms: A Blogpost in Progress

Noa Yaari, Into My Arms I, 2019. Ink on Paper, 17.7×25.4 cm. Toronto. Noa Yaari, Into My Arms II, 2019. Ink on Paper, 17.7×25.4 cm. Toronto.    

Posted in My Art

Multiform Grammar

Noa Yaari, Multiform Grammar is Making Us Rich, 2019. Mixed media, 17.7×25.4 cm. Toronto.

Posted in My Art

Multiform Grammar and the Working Memory

In 1974, psychologists Alan Baddeley and Graham Hitch offered a model of the working memory, which was revised by Baddeley in 2000. According to the 1974 model, the working memory is a system that enables temporary storage and manipulation of … Continue reading

Posted in Contemplations, My Art

Mother

Noa Yari, Mother, 2019. A poster. Toronto

Posted in Uncategorized

Queen

Noa Yaari, Queen, 2019. A poster. Toronto

Posted in Uncategorized

Pulling and Pushing Forces in Multiform References

Explicit, implicit and indeterminate multiform references (MFRs) maintain pulling and pushing forces between their verbal and visual poles. These forces are the mechanisms that potentially move readers to shift their attention between words and images across a multiform argument (MFA) … Continue reading

Posted in Contemplations, Dissertation, Teaching